Mortality Plays
writer / illustrator /
lorewitch / grump

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THERE AT NIGHT
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· lorewitch · grump

ABOUTWe Don't Go There At Night

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wrywlf:

  • Making you feel like you have no choice
  • Making you feel like contradicting them in anything would hurt them, making you selfish
  • Making you feel guilty in a vague, impossible to articulate way, like your existence is essentially Wrong and has to be redeemed
  • Making you double and triple guess things you think about yourself
  • Making you think “I deserve much worse” as a way to excuse how you’re being treated
  • Making you wonder why caring about someone has to hurt so much

This is far from an exhaustive list but it is a few of the things I see (and have experienced) most often in people who are being manipulated or trapped in abusive relationships of some kind or another.

I wish I had some good catch all advice for what to do if you find yourself in a place like this but all I can think to say is talk to people about it. Reach out to others. It can be scary and it can feel hopeless even when you try, but you do not deserve to be made to feel like that.

And that’s true no matter who they are. No one deserves to make you feel like this. It doesn’t matter how much they hurt or how badly life has treated them, we are all responsible for the hurt we cause others and must be willing to acknowledge that.

(via rincewitch)

abuse cw /
mortalityplays:

Mythos Update
First page of a brand new story! Check it out! I’m pretty pleased with this one, even though it took forever this week due to Circumstances. We are gonna have some fun in this chapter!
Read From Start | Previous Story | RSS
Storenvy! | Donate!



Hey, this updated last night!

mortalityplays:

Mythos Update

First page of a brand new story! Check it out! I’m pretty pleased with this one, even though it took forever this week due to Circumstances. We are gonna have some fun in this chapter!

Read From Start | Previous Story | RSS

Storenvy! | Donate!

Hey, this updated last night!

(via webcomixwatch)

countershotpress:

Sunday Spotlight: Gettin’ Grubby

Hey! It’s Rosa here this week, popping in at the last minute to talk a little about making comics the filthy, laborious caveman way.

Drawing my pages traditionally is something I’ve been doing on Mythos since day one. Although The Story Circle is all digitally coloured, it started the same way most of my chapters do: as paper, pencil, and ink. Since then, three chapters have been fully traditional, two have been fully digital, and the rest have been a mixture of brush and pen inked lines and digital colour, with a little pencil hatching, ink spatter and paper collage thrown in for fun.

There are a few reasons I choose to do this, even though working digitally would be faster, cheaper, and a lot tidier. First, I have far more experience with a pencil than I do with a tablet pen. When I started the comic, I wasn’t confident that I could produce clear and consistent pages digitally — but I knew that I could draw on paper, and figured that experience with the tablet would come as I progressed. Second, Mythos is an anthology comic, and I love the very different ‘voices’ that different media can lend to a story. I’ve always been a fan of the small organic flaws that unedited traditional work often displays, and to me they feel like a natural fit for a comic based around folklore and oral traditions.

Third, this is my first serious graphic project, and I’ve always intended to learn from it as I go along. Since scribbling out the first page on cheap printer paper with an HB pencil and ballpoint pen, I’ve tried out making comics with all kinds of materials: nib and brush ink, bristol board, watercolours, charcoal, chalk pastels, acrylics, technical pencils, papercraft, markers…some things I’d used before, and others I threw myself into just to see if I’d sink or swim. They do say that a jack of all trades is master of none, but then the skill I hope to master is making good comics. By the end of Mythos’ run, hopefully I’ll be pretty clued in to the effects and techniques which alter the atmosphere of a story, whatever medium I settle on for the next project.

Finally, I’m a dopy old fashioned romantic. I write best with a pencil on paper, and I feel most like an artist when I’m up to my elbows in paint and ink and white-out and charcoal dust. I love the feeling that I’m mastering the same craft as Walt Kelly and George Herriman and Percy Crosby and Bill Watterson, and all the old school cartoonists through the ages who all managed to produce such distinct and characterful work out of the same white pages and black liquid ink. Of course that doesn’t mean digital comics can’t be all that and more — but for me personally, working with my hands, building disgusting callouses where the pencil rests, and getting my face and fingernails so filthy I can’t go out in public are all part of the joy of making comics. 

This went up late last night, but includes a pretty neat process gif of the newest page, so here it is again!

Bojack Horseman is better than I expected it to be.

animation bojack horseman

For the wellbeing and assurance of any followers caught up in this:

Read More

myc &c.
so anyway, goodnight

so anyway, goodnight

(Source: 420sc, via illustratedanatomy)

Mythos Update
First page of a brand new story! Check it out! I’m pretty pleased with this one, even though it took forever this week due to Circumstances. We are gonna have some fun in this chapter!
Read From Start | Previous Story | RSS
Storenvy! | Donate!

Mythos Update

First page of a brand new story! Check it out! I’m pretty pleased with this one, even though it took forever this week due to Circumstances. We are gonna have some fun in this chapter!

Read From Start | Previous Story | RSS

Storenvy! | Donate!

mythos comic comics webcomics pagan mythology countershot press
Blacklisted: The Secret Government Rulebook For Labeling You a Terrorist

(Source: ghostbongweedofthesamurai, via collaterlysisters)

theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

(Source: melanskyyworld, via amphiaria)

history music dance

Have you read “When God was a Woman”? That was my History 101 book, and basically explains me from that point on.

No, but I’m sold! I’ve been reading The Womens’ History of the World on and off recently, which has an interesting few chapters on prehistory and feminist re-interpretations of archaelogical evidence. My edition was published sometime in the 80s, so bits of it are kind of dated, but the critiques of male-guided history are spot on to the point that I’m pretty sure it predicted a bunch of the archaeological reassessments that have been made since (women cave painters, women among Viking raiders, women in warrior burials erroniously identified as male, etc). 

I’m going to make a lavish library trip this month, so I’ll make sure to track down When God Was a Woman.

androdjinni